Practicing Away from the Piano

The first time I have heard of this concept was last summer when I attended the Royal Conservatoire’s Piano Summer School. It’s such an interesting concept and it’s quite helpful before entering performances.

I usually have the music score out and follow my whole programme all the way through. It’s as tiring as playing it physically! Focussing on the quality of sound and being musical and relaxed.

I tend to get tension and forget to breathe when it comes to the sections that are extra challenging for me – which takes away a lot of space for the Music to breathe. I’ve been practicing on controlling it and being more engaged.

I am happy to say that I have improved a lot and this is the best I’ve ever been.

I’ll be doing much more practice away from the Piano, right now, I’m not doing it enough. It can be done any time of the day! From memory while you’re doing other things :)) Although, it’s best to be focussed on it 100%.

Keep striving guys! 🙂 You’ll get to where you want to be!

Much love,
Patricia

Piano Recital and Audition

I have had a hectic start to 2019, preparing for my Piano recital and Bachelor of Education (Music) audition at the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland. It has been a rollercoaster of emotions, panicking here and there internally during practices and then having an unusual wave of calmness on the day itself.

Glasgow City Halls: Piano Recital

29 January 2019

Beethoven – Sonata ‘Pathetique’ in C Minor, Op. 13

Last year, in November, I sat an ABRSM (Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music) Performance Assessment for the first and third movements of Beethoven’s Sonata ‘Pathetique’ in C Minor, op. 13. I challenged myself to play from memory under pressure and pushed through! The examiner definitely enjoyed my performance and gave me lots of feedback on it, areas to develop and improve on.

I took her advice and started working on the whole Sonata, November to January may seem like a lot of time but it wasn’t. I barely had time to have consistent practice as it was peak season in retail so I had to work a lot with long hours, many days in a row, leaving me too exhausted to practice. Once January came, I had more time to focus on it in practice and during lessons – playing from memory under pressure is a huge obstacle for me and fear overwhelms me always.

I did all the work, I knew the piece inside out, knew all the notes as I have been working on this Sonata for over 2 years now. I hesitated performing the whole Sonata as it was daunting – it was 18 minutes long and it really tested my performance endurance.

When the day came, I was still in panic mode in the morning at the Piano Day in Glasgow City Halls. My mentor and Piano teacher who organised the event spoke to me to help me calm my nerves, reassuring me that everything is going to be alright. I taught some upper secondary school students in groups and individually on Piano, giving them a masterclass style lesson on how to improve their playing and performance. It was inspiring to see them progress and enjoy performing on Piano in front of an audience, as if no one was watching. It reminded me of when I first started playing and how much I loved and enjoyed it.

I took that inspiration from the students and focussed during my pre-recital practice. Reminding myself that I love performing, bringing me back to that feeling of enjoyment instead of performing for the sake of getting it done and over with. Within that hour, I managed to change my mindset and performed the whole Sonata from memory.

I was the finale performer, so the pressure was on but I find speaking about the composer and the piece to the students calming and eased me. It was a huge achievement for me to have played the whole Sonata from memory, all of the years of hard work was worth it! It was so fulfilling to receive the reception from others and I am glad to have inspired the young Pianists. I hope to perform again soon!

Royal Conservatoire of Scotland: BEd Audition

14 February 2019

Audition Pieces for the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland Bachelor of Education (Music)

Soon after the Piano Recital, I got my head back in gear for the audition. This is my third time auditioning, after unsuccessful ones.

For the Bachelor of Education (Music) audition, I had to prepare for the following:

  • Audition
  • Theory Paper Entrance Exam
  • Interview

I was at the Royal Conservatoire for 4 hours and spent Valentine’s Day auditioning – who needs a Valentine anyway?

The audition pieces I chose for Piano were the Brahms Intermezzo in A Major, Op. 118 No. 2 and Bartok’s Bulgarian Dance No. 3 from ‘Mikrokosmos’ Vol. 6. It shows an interesting contrast between pieces, Brahms was a Romantic style piece and Bartok was a folk song in the 20th Century period. The singing audition piece I chose was Handel’s Aria Lascia Ch’iopianga from the Baroque period. I had an interesting programme and showed different styles from different musical periods.

In the audition, I had to present a singing piece, two audition pieces, a set piece, keyboard harmonisation and sight reading – all in a 20 minute audition. In preparation for this, I attended regular Vocal and Piano lessons at the Royal Conservatoire as part of the Transitions programme and also some audition preparation courses. It was an advantage for me as I knew the audition panelists as they have taught me before.

I was surprisingly calm the day before and when I entered the audition room. I warmed up in one of the practice rooms with a Steinway Grand Piano and I enjoyed it, I took it as an opportunity to showcase what I have to offer – the nerves went away as I started to play. There were 3 panelists in the audition: a specialist of your principal study, head of department and a principal/school teacher. I loved how calm they made me and I found time to settle down before starting. It wasn’t as daunting as before. It was ecstatic to get my hands on a Steinway Grand Piano again, as this is a rare opportunity.

I then took a Grade 5 Theory Paper which lasted for an hour. I found it manageable, although I did forget one music concept and it was a basic one. How could I have mistakened Largo for fast? For those of you who do not know, it is a Tempo marking (speed of the piece) that means slow and stately. That was probably my only regret of that day. Other than that, I was satisfied with the exam.

Lastly, I had my interview with the department of Education. The head of the panel remembered me from last year. I spoke about my performance and teaching experience in the classroom. Music has always been something so dear to me as it helped me discover who I really am and it gave me a way to express myself. With the guidance of my Music teachers, I was inspired and want to pass on the experience and knowledge that I got to the next generation of Musicians. It introduced me to a community that made me feel welcome, I found my sense of belonging playing and performing with others in ensembles and bands. It helped with my discipline and kept my passion burning.

Fingers crossed, I hope that I get the results that I worked hard for. I am already feeling excited about getting my own classroom and Piano studio someday and I will do whatever it takes to get there! 🙂

Believe in yourself, challenge yourself to grow and keep striving for your dreams!

Much love,
Patricia